While the biometric-based OneID journey is an emerging frontier for the aviation industry, there are already many lessons to be learned from early trials of the technology. From understanding how success comes down to passenger demographics to having realistic use cases to understanding that there is no “one size fits all” plug-and-play solution, industry stakeholders can gain a better understanding by learning from others who are trialing or implementing new systems. Embracing these lessons learned will help advance the overall adoption and success of biometrics throughout the entire aviation industry.

In our ongoing video series, Chris Forrest, vice president of airports systems at Collins Aerospace, shared with us a number of these lessons learned, which also includes how increased throughput should be achieved, and how end-to-end biometrics solutions can truly help to maximize overall value.

“From an airport and airline point of view, you need to ask yourself why you are implementing this technology,” said Forrest. “In addition, it’s critical to have airline headquarters and local staff fully aligned on all efforts, otherwise there will be significant disconnects. And, you need a concerted plan to educate the public on how to use these new innovations, which will make adoption much smoother.” Want to know all the key lessons learned when starting your biometrics journey? Listen to Chris Forrest’s recommendations in this short video.

If you missed earlier segments in this series, be sure to listen to our first video where Chris addresses the overall questions stakeholders should be asking themselves before embarking on their biometric journey here.  In the second video, Chris offers examples of the key questions to ask vendors  when partnering in your airport biometric journey, which you can watch here.

Find our aviation stakeholders checklist for download here.

Shany Seawright

About Shany Seawright

A senior executive at Strategic Communications Group and Managing Editor of Connected Aviation Today, as well as other publications, Seawright oversees the editorial direction of the publication and managed the editorial staff.